press

"Unresolved feelings and unsatisfied ambitions animate 'A Woman, A Part,' Elisabeth Subrin’s sophisticated take on female friendship and professional frustration... Touching on issues of artistic survival and the porous boundary between work and pleasure, Ms. Subrin, an accomplished visual artist and filmmaker, sifts addiction, celebrity and the plight of the aging actress into something rarefied yet real. A strong, intelligent screen presence, Ms. Siff can make the simplest line feel pregnant with possibility. And Ms. Seymour is the perfect counterpoint, giving Kate a warm vulnerability that’s never overplayed or milked for sentiment."

NEW YORK TIMES

Jeannette Catsoulis


Variety

OWEN GLEIBERMAN

"As a filmmaker, Subrin has the confidence to let a moment ramble, but she’s also a disciplined scene-shaper who jump-cuts her way through the movie (the terrific editing is by Jenn Ruff), so that the audience never feels it’s getting bogged down; each moment has been chosen for us. And the actors are marvelous — one look at each of them, and you feel the decades of backstory. Though not much happens, you’re more than eager to know what everyone’s going to say next. I’m also eager to know what’s next for Maggie Siff and filmmaker Elisabeth Subrin — who, as this movie demonstrates, both deserve radically higher profiles."


"The film is an astute character study that is analytical but never unemotional. Subrin has a background in experimental shorts and video art, and moments of surreality pepper “A Woman, A Part” but never eclipse the thrust of the characters’ journey. Siff is wonderful, but Ortiz and Seymour nearly steal the movie out from under her. For Subrin, it’s not just a promising entry into the world of narrative filmmaking but already a fine achievement."


“…actors often nowadays seem to have more freedom to push the boundaries of their art and to explore its radical possibilities. This is what Maggie Siff does in Elisabeth Subrin’s A Woman, A Part, a psychological study of just how contradictorary and terrifying it can be to pretend, as a matter of professional duty, to be someone else.” 

New York Times

a.o. scott


indiewire

kate erbland

“Elisabeth Subrin’s A Woman, A Part takes on the industry with grace, insight and some big ideas.”


“If only more American independent cinema was this poignant and compelling.”

artforum

ERIKA BALSOM


"The discipline pays off; “A Woman, a Part” mixes passion and ambivalence to create a work with ambiguities that seem earned, and lived in."

ROGEREBERT.COM

GLENN KENNY


“A lovely surprise…For her feature debut Subrin took what feels like a radical approach of entrusting the truth of her story to highly skilled actors. There are a few poetic flourishes, but A Woman, A Part is about emotional honesty…All three actors are wonderful…”

HAMMER TO NAIL

SUSANNA LOCASCIO


“There are thematic, if not tonal, parallels with Olivier Assayas’ Clouds of SIls Maria, and it’s likely that the film will appeal to a similar demographic with a taste for sophisticated storytelling about well-developed female characters.”

SCREEN DAILY

WENDY IDE


“Subrin proves a gifted director of actors, and the film, in its small-scale theatrical visor, is an excellent showcase for its leads.”

VILLAGE VOICE

CALUM MARSH 


“For her feature debut, Subrin forsakes the experimentalism of her short films and video installations for a relatively conventional narrative and storytelling grammar. No matter: A Woman, A Part is compelling all the same…”

BROOKLYN MAGAZINE

KENJI FUJISHIMA


“The performances are all wonderfully lived in, with Siff, Ortiz and Seymour all portraying a real sense of shared history… It’s the dynamics between these characters and their feelings of discontentment that elevates A Woman, A Part from a smart character study to a film that unveils emotional introspection at every given turn, becoming something evocative and timely. A Woman, A Part is a strong showcase for all involved, Subrin in particular, who’s innovative and artful direction inspires a sense of wonder.”

THE YOUNG ONES

ALLYSON JOHNSON


“Shot meticulously by cinematographer Chris Dapkins, who previously collaborated on Tim Sutton’s “Memphis” and “Pavillion”, you rarely see Anna whole, often scattered across each scene as she attempts to piece herself back together and while she drifts the streets of the city, there’s no one you’d rather follow than Siff, who brings a confidence to the character in as Anna experiences a breakdown… The way Subrin’s mosaic-like structuring comes together is quite rewarding, carefully calibrated in its haunting musical choices and nuanced performances, and whether or not Anna can rekindle her own passion, that zeal is felt throughout A Woman, A Part…”

THE MOVEABLE FEST

STEPHEN SAITO


“Subrin’s drama is an insightful, heartfelt examination of acting, and how it can allow us to access emotional parts of ourselves that we otherwise wouldn’t buy can also serve as a cover against being truly genuine. Siff, so incredible this year on Billions, proves that her continually rising fame is no fluke, while Seymour and Ortiz deliver in supporting roles. A Woman, A Part owes a debt to John Cassavetes in the way it examines gender roles and the life of an actress, but it feels confidently its own piece at the same time.”

ROGEREBERT.COM

BRIAN TALLERICO